Travel

Travel

10 of the best narrow-gauge railway journeys in Britain

Hop aboard one of these fantastic British railway adventures – with the chance to see wildlife and wonderful scenery along the route

The Ffestiniog winds its way from Porthmadog through more than 13 miles of stunning countryside. Waterfalls cascade and streams froth down mossy rock sides. Swathes of deep green grass soar on one side while valleys dip spectacularly on the other, affording the chance to look down on treetops far below. Sharp bends in the line offer splendid views of the engine as it chugs onward and upward to Blaenau Ffestiniog, where there’s a chance to travel on an even smaller train into a former slate mine. The slate-waste landscape at the top of the line makes a fascinating contrast with the natural beauties below.
Adult rover ticket £24, one child under 16 travels free with each adult, under-3 free. Dogs and bicycles welcome, festrail.co.uk

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Architecture

Innovative weed pipe has a built-in cereal bowl. Whhhaaaaa?

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Smoking weed and eating cereal go together like peanut butter and jelly, so why not do both at the same time?

Cannabis technology has boomed since recent legalization, but among the various
THC extraction processes and fancy vapes, there is a new bowl that can do something all others can’t: hold food like a food bowl.

Yes, some genius decided to combine a glass weed pipe, commonly called a bowl, with a food bowl, creating a very important mythical stoner invention. Here you have it: the Breakfast Bowl Wake ‘n’ Bake Pipe.

The pipe has been somewhat of an internet legend for many years, but wasn’t actually available to purchase anywhere, so creator Ryan Hart decided to make his own and sell it to the world for $89Read more…

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Travel

Eagle + Child, Ramsbottom, Lancashire: hotel review

This nattily revamped pub has a new look and an excellent new chef – a welcome addition to this handsome town’s already thriving food scene

A historic Pennine mill town of stone cottages, cobbled alleys and imposing Victorian architecture, Ramsbottom can feel pretty remote from 21st-century life.

At weekends, you can arrive from nearby Bury by steam train on the East Lancashire Railway, perhaps to attend the World Black Pudding Throwing Championships (September 10). Later, as this is such fantastic walking country, you might clamber up Holcombe Moor to Peel Tower which (think Catherine Cookson) looks like the perfect backdrop for a fierce, rain-lashed argument between a pregnant scullery maid and her feckless wealthy lover.

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Business

5 Best Travel Hacks for Business Travellers

This article originally appeared on ValuePenguin To the outside world, travelling overseas for business seems to be both thrilling and glamorous. Who wouldn’t like to visit another country on an all-expense-paid trip? But for those who are constantly jetting off on work, the excitement soon wears off. When you are on a business trip, you need to be absolutely punctual – being late for meetings just won’t do. You probably have to juggle several activities simultaneously, leaving you little time for relaxation or sometimes even sleep. How can you then, as a businessperson travelling out of Singapore, make the most of your trip professionally? While each business trip may differ, here are some tips that you may find useful for every trip. Use an airline miles credit card to save on ticketing costs Booking tickets can be one of the most time-consuming and arduous tasks for a professional planning an overseas business trip. Comparing different airlines’ ticket costs and deciding on the most suitable time to take your flight can lead to a very frustrating experience for even the simplest of bookings. This is where using a credit card specifically tailored to take advantage of airline offers comes in. By their […]

The post 5 Best Travel Hacks for Business Travellers appeared first on The New Savvy.

Architecture

AirAsia X flight shook like a ‘washing machine’ following mid-air problem

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An AirAsia X flight bound for Kuala Lumpur was forced to turn back on Sunday, after a mid-air technical issue left the plane’s cabin shaking like a “washing machine.”

Flight D7237 with 359 passengers onboard left Perth at 6:50 a.m. local time, then returned to Perth by 10 a.m., after what reportedly seemed to be a problem with an engine.

“I heard a loud explosion I think on the left-side engine,” passenger Tzeyau Chung told ABC News.

“After the explosion it started to shake, it started to bounce, but overall the captain did a very good job. Of course we were a bit worried but at the end of the day … we safely landed. I think that is the most important thing.” Read more…

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Business

Kayak’s emoji search function brings the speed and fun of texting to travel

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Travel should be fun, not a hellish slog through dystopian security checkpoints and zombie-service employees with penal institution levels of charm. 

That’s why Kayak’s decision to add a bit of whimsy into the travel process by adding an emoji search function is more than welcome. 

If you’re not emoji fluent, this is the perfect excuse to step up your emoji game and learn about some of the more obscure symbols hiding in your texting arsenal. 

The function doesn’t work for all cities yet, but the first cities included are New York (🗽), Tokyo (🍣  sushi!), Chicago (🐇  O’Hare Airport), Dublin, Ireland (☘️ ), Las Vegas (slots! 🎰 ), Easter Island (🗿 ), Amsterdam (🚨 red light, get it?), Los Angeles, San Francisco (📱 yep, that’s a smartphone), and Toronto (🍁 ).  Read more…

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Business

Here’s why airlines have trouble with your hyphenated name

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If your name is too long, too short, hyphenated, or contains an apostrophe — you probably have trouble while flying.

Apostrophes, hyphens, and other special characters in names have been an issue for flyers for many years. A blog post from 2007 describes a flyer having trouble with booking a ticket because of a hyphenated last name. A decade later, another flyer, John Scott-Railton wrote a blog post about the same issue. Both airlines and technology have evolved plenty in that span and yet flying with a hyphenated name is as bad as ever. 

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Entertainment

How I Found My Zen in Kyoto’s Different Gardens and Temples

Last week I went on a five-day trip to Japan with my boyfriend and two friends. Our plan was to spend three days in Osaka and two days in Kyoto. In Japan almost every municipality has at least one temple. Kyoto, being a large cultural center, has several hundred. So we wanted to take a […]

The post How I Found My Zen in Kyoto’s Different Gardens and Temples appeared first on Preen.

Travel

Serene summer in Finland’s centenary national park

The Nordic country’s newly opened Hossa national park has all the wilderness an adventure traveller – or a bear – could desire

In a hide two miles from the Russian border in Finland’s Suomussalmi region, we watch and wait. For centuries, the European brown bear has been pushed by deforestation into increasingly remote areas, to do what a bear proverbially does in woods. Luckily, in Finland, where 76% of the land mass is dense forest, a bear doesn’t have to go very far for a little private time.

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Architecture

‘Westworld’ star James Marsden gives us a peek at Season 2 gunslinging

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The next season of Westworld is still a long ways away, but that doesn’t mean the cast isn’t hard at work putting together the next installment of robots vs. humans drama. 

We got our first sort-of-peek at Westworld Season 2 on Friday thanks to show regular James Marsden. The actor, who plays one of the pivotal robot characters on Westworld, took to Instagram to show off some of his gunslinging skills. 

Westworld quick draw training! 🤠 @hbo #Westworld #season2

A post shared by James Marsden (@james_marsden) on Jun 22, 2017 at 4:52pm PDT Read more…

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Travel

East Sicily: what to see plus the best bars, beaches, restaurants and hotels

With baroque palaces, fine beaches and Mount Etna, the Ionian coast is home to most of the island’s crown jewels – underpinned by glorious local food and drink

Light reflecting off churches and palaces, views of craggy mountains and blue sea, smells of orange blossom, oregano and mint … Sicily is an inspiring place, particularly for northern Europeans. “To have seen Italy without having seen Sicily is not to have seen Italy at all,” said German writer Goethe in 1787.

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Travel

Hut stuff: Bournemouth’s new beach lodges

The seaside resort has reimagined the classic British beach hut as a chic bolthole that makes for an idyllic family break

When it comes to tourism initiatives, you can’t knock Bournemouth council for ambition. A decade ago, it had the seemingly brilliant idea of creating an artificial surf reef off Boscombe beach aimed at attracting surfers from far and wide, and also help renew the immediate area, one of the most deprived neighbourhoods in the whole of the south-west, according to a local charity. Sadly, it was a disaster and the project sank without trace, though the huge sandbags are still teetering somewhere on the sea bed.

But despite its failure to make waves (at least the right sort – it did generate plenty of unwanted headlines), such was the hype surrounding the proposed reef that redevelopment of the Boscombe pier area began anyway.

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Architecture

Tesla may launch its own music streaming service because, well, why not

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Why dip your toes into the plebeian pool of music streaming services when you can have your own private aural sauna?

That appears to be the question Tesla is asking, with reports suggesting the electric car company is exploring launching a music streaming service for its vehicles. That’s right, it looks like Tesla just might fancy its customers a bit too hifalutin’ for the likes of Spotify or Apple Music. 

The details, as reported by Recode, are light. Even so, they’re enough to send a jolt of excitement through every Tesla fanboy already growing weary of the Insane button and Bioweapon Defense Mode. Here’s the deal: Tesla is allegedly chatting with all the major music labels about a proprietary music streaming service for its cars.  Read more…

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Travel

10 top tips from our Los Angeles correspondent

Stars in the sky and on the silver screen, trips to the beach and a cemetery, plus a stroll with a local actor who calls himself ‘the people walker’ … LA delivers the goods for our west coast writer

Watch a movie at the Aero in Santa Monica, or the Egyptian in Hollywood: both are part of AmericanCinematheque, a not-for-profit organisation dedicated to promoting “America’s indigenous art form – the moving picture”. It has an old-style ambience and eclectic choices, and after screenings there are often Q&As with the films’ directors and stars. You can see top talent, especially in autumn – the run-up to awards season – when Oscar hopefuls come out to lobby.
americancinematheque.com

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Architecture

Adorable little dog was reportedly saved by mouth-to-nose resuscitation

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You’d be hard-pressed to find someone who knows doggy CPR, so when man’s best friend is in trouble, improvisation is key.

Glenn Rowe, a farmer from Wimmera in Australia, claimed he saved the life of his kelpie Jack when the dog was lifeless after accidentally strangling himself on a lead attached to a quad bike.

“I thought crikey, he’s not looking too good, he was all glassy eyed — yeah, he was cactus,” Rowe told radio station 3AW.

Rowe leapt into action by giving the dog a bit of improvised CPR. The farmer pumped him on the chest, which wasn’t effective. So then he started blowing into his nose. Read more…

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Travel

Just chillin’: welcome to Iceland’s wild, wild Westfjords

Iceland’s popularity with tourists doesn’t mean that solitude is hard to find. Head west to its fjords and splendid isolation and nature are close at hand

There were no boats in the bay, no ships on the horizon. Underneath my feet was black sand that stretched a few hundred metres either side. The mountains of Deilir and Öskubakur were behind me and together we took in the sea view from Skálavík bay in Iceland’s Westfjords. The Denmark Strait was the water we watched and many miles north lay the east coast of Greenland.

Skálavík’s population is zero, the last residents having admitted defeat in 1964 in the face of weather that demanded more than a snug fleece and a decent pair of boots. Even in its pomp, in the 1890s, only 100 people toughed it out trying to make a living from the sea and the land. Now there are just hiking trails, plus a smattering of summer holiday homes and static caravans that sustain against the elements, courtesy of fences that rise above window level. Swings, a pushchair and toys on a porch or in a garden provided an eerie touch: a sort of presence amid absence.

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Architecture

Friendly koala walks into a restaurant full of diners like it’s NBD

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It’s not always like this in Australia, but a koala walking into a restaurant is definitely something that could only happen Down Under.

As one did at Genghis Khan Mongolian BBQ in suburban Adelaide on Monday night, according to The Advertiser

The very chill koala wandered in from the carpark into the restaurant, where bemused patrons couldn’t help but snap photos. Xenia Ioannou, who dubbed the koala “Jeffrey,” filmed the moment and posted it on Facebook. 

“Some people were shocked, some just carried on eating,” Ioannou told the newspaper. “Being up close to nature and seeing a wild animal was unbelievable.” Read more…

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