Food

How to Make Healthy Pumpkin Pancakes at Home

Each month your favorite dishes get a healthy and delectable do-over with tips from Keri Glassman, R.D.

Pumpkin Picking
Everyone’s favorite autumn gourd is ultra high in nutrients: Each serving in this breakfast contains about 85 percent of the recommended daily intake of vitamin A, which supports supersharp vision and may lower your risk for certain types of cancer.

Dairy Double Take
Don’t fear full-fat milk in small doses. A new study comparing it with skim shows it has higher levels of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids.

Smart Sap
Pure maple syrup comes straight from the tree, which means it has zero artificial ingredients or added sugar. Check the label: The stuff you’re drizzling could be loaded with high-fructose corn syrup. (And regardless, take it easy with your pour—a tablespoon of the real deal still has about 50 calories.)

Go Nuts
Talk about a top topper: Pecans are rich in compounds called flavonoids that can lower your risk for heart disease and decrease LDL (“bad”) cholesterol. Plus, they have belly-friendly monounsaturated fats and more antioxidants than most tree nuts.

Pancake-House Arrest
A stack of flapjacks from a chain restaurant can set you back 600 to 800 cals, with many choices soaring over 1,000 (and packing up to 60 grams of sugar—this version has almost two-thirds less).

Brian Kennedy

1 1/4 cups canned pumpkin
2 cups chickpea flour
2 eggs
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1 Tbsp brown sugar
2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 cup whole milk
1 tsp coconut oil
4 Tbsp organic maple syrup
1 Tbsp chopped pecans

Beat pumpkin with flour, eggs, nutmeg, cinnamon, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and milk. Warm oil in a skillet over medium heat. Scoop 1/4 cup of batter at a time onto skillet. Flip pancake when edges look cooked and bubbles form. Cook the reverse side for 1 to 2 minutes. Continue with remaining batter, making 12 to 16 pancakes. Top with syrup and pecans.

Serves 4
Per serving: 370 cal, 10 g fat, (3.5 g sat), 54 g carbs, 500 mg sodium, 8 g fiber, 16 g protein

More from Women’s Health:
10 Pumpkin Smoothies to Kick Off Fall RIGHT
9 Amazing Pumpkin Recipes
31 Healthy Breakfast Recipes That Will Promote Weight Loss All Month Long

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Food

Scary News About Your Morning Glass of Juice

You might want to find another go-to breakfast beverage.

If you think of your morning glass of OJ as a naturally sweet vitamin-delivery system, pay attention to this: A new study published in the journal Appetite has linked frequent consumption of fruit juice to higher blood-pressure levels—which in turn can increase your risk of heart disease and stroke. The more often a person downed fruit juice, the higher their blood pressure was, according to the study.

With so much new research out these days showing that sweetened sodas and other added-sugar beverages contribute to elevated blood pressure and chronic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes, a research team in Australia wanted to know if fruit juice might also lead to these negative effects. Though fruit juice has a big health halo around it, it’s actually not all that good for us: It’s loaded with natural fruit sugar, but unlike fruit, it has no filling fiber. So it’s easy to down a lot of it without feeling satiated, say the researchers.

MORE: 7 Fall Fruits and Veggies That are PACKED with Nutrients

For the study, researchers questioned 160 healthy adults about their dietary habits over the past year, particularly how often they consumed juice. The study authors then tested the participants’ blood-pressure levels multiple ways. They discovered that the study subjects who said they consumed juice daily were significantly more likely to have higher blood pressure than those who said they drank it occasionally or rarely.

The takeaway, researchers suggest, is that consuming fruit juice every day might be behind the higher blood-pressure readings. But the study does have some limitations: For one, the sample size was very small. But also, the study was only designed to determine correlation, so it’s way too premature to say fruit juice actually caused the elevated blood-pressure levels. Still, if you drink a lot of the stuff, it might be a good idea to cut back.

Beside the link to increased blood pressure, juice is relatively high in calories (a small eight-ounce glass of OJ racks up 80 calories) and super-low in satiety—so it’s easy to guzzle a lot of the stuff and ending up taking in tons of sugary liquid calories. Instead, hit your daily fruit requirement by eating whole fruit. Find out more about the downsides of fruit juice. And check out these tips to make juice less sugary and caloric.

MORE: 5 Fruits and Veggies You’ve Been Eating Wrong

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Food

The 5 Best Ways to Fuel Up for a Workout

Motivation for your mouth

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The 8 Best Healthy Energy Drinks

Jonesing for a healthy jolt? Look no further.

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9 Packaged Breakfast Foods That Are Actually Healthy

Ladies, crank up your (calorie-burning) engines.

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10 Healthy Foods That Boost Energy AND Weight Loss

Amp up your grocery list with these overachievers.

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Food

3 Swear-Worthy Recipes From the Thug Kitchen Cookbook

Food so good you'll swear by it

Tired of hearing about fancy-ass microgreens and gluten free grains? Eating real, healthy food isn’t a big f**king deal, as the curse-happy creators of the insanely popular Thug Kitchen Blog demonstate in their debut cookbook

Rise And Shine Already!

Thug Kitchen

Maple Berry Grits
Grits—creamy, slightly sweet, and full of fiber, iron, and vitamin B—don’t get enough love at breakfast. Grab some and start your day with a little variety. It’s about damn time to try something new.

2 cups water
2 cups almond or other nondairy milk
1 cup stone-ground grits*
1/4-1/2 tsp salt
1-2 tsp maple syrup or your favorite liquid sweetener
1-2 Tbsp of your favorite jam
1 Tbsp (or more if you love ’em) fresh berries

*Not that instant bullshit.

1. Bring water and nondairy milk to a boil over medium heat. Whisk in grits and 1/4 tsp of the salt. Bring to a boil again, then lower the heat, cover it, and let that deliciousness simmer for 20 minutes. Stir that shit occasionally, ’cause you don’t want anything sticking to the bottom.
2. When grits have absorbed most of the liquid and are tender, turn the heat off. Taste, and add the syrup and the rest of the salt, if you think it needs it. That’s on you. Top with a small scoop (or two) of your favorite jam and some fresh berries so it looks classy as f**k.

Makes 4 Servings. Per serving: 190 cal, 2 g fat (0 g sat), 40 g carbs, 240 mg sodium, 2 g fiber, 3 g protein

MORE: 31 Healthy Breakfast Recipes That Will Promote Weight Loss All Month Long

Bomb-Ass Meal

Thug Kitchen

Roasted Beer & Lime Cauliflower Tacos with Cilantro Coleslaw
Seasoned cauliflower piled into corn tortillas is a special f**king delivery directly to your taste buds. Grab some beer and get to work.

3/4 cup beer
1/4 cup vegetable broth
1 Tbsp lime juice
1 1/2 tsp tamari
1 1/2 Tbsp of your go-to hot sauce
1-2 cloves garlic, sliced
1 head cauliflower, chopped
1 1/2 tsp chili powder
1 tsp smoked paprika
1/4 tsp ground cumin
1/4 tsp garlic powder
Pinch of salt
1 Tbsp olive oil
1/2 yellow onion, chopped
6 corn tortillas
1 avocado, sliced
Quick Lime and Cilantro Slaw (recipe below)

1. Crank your oven to 400°F.
2. In a saucepan, warm the beer, broth, lime juice, tamari, hot sauce, and garlic over medium heat. Add cauliflower and simmer for about 1 1/2 minutes. Then drain that shit.
3. Toss spices, salt, and oil in a bowl. Add cauliflower and onion, and coat those f**kers. Bake until browned, stirring halfway, about 20 minutes total.
4. Warm tortillas, then fill them with the cauliflower mixture, slices of avocado, and slaw. Top with some salsa if you feel like it.

Quick Lime and Cilantro Slaw

2 Tbsp lime juice
2 Tbsp seasoned rice vinegar
1 tsp olive oil
1/8 tsp salt
1/2 head green cabbage, sliced thinly
1 small carrot, cut into matchsticks
1/3 cup chopped cilantro

Mix lime juice, vinegar, oil, and salt. Add cabbage and carrots right before you’re ready to eat, and toss that shit well. Add cilantro and serve.

Makes about 6 tacos. Per taco: 220 cal, 9 g fat (1 g sat), 29 g carbs, 400 mg sodium, 7 g fiber, 5 g protein

MORE: Homemade Upgrade: How to Make a Healthy Taco Salad

Big-Ass Cup of Cozy

Thug Kitchen

Pozole Rojo
Trying to decide between chili or soup? F**k it, have both—and find harmony with hominy.

5 large dried guajillo or ancho chilies, toasted
2 cups warm water
5 cloves garlic, chopped
2 Tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder
1 tsp olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
8 oz tempeh, crumbled
2 tsp soy sauce or tamari
1 can hominy (29 oz)
1 zucchini, chopped
1 Tbsp dried oregano
2 tsp ground cumin
1/4 tsp salt
5 cups vegetable broth
1 tsp maple syrup or other liquid sweetener
Juice of 1 lime

1. Throw chilies in the water and soak that shit for 15 to 20 minutes. Remove chilies but hang on to the water. Cut off chili tops, remove seeds, and chop those bastards up. Throw them in a blender or food processor with garlic, cocoa powder, and pepper water and blend until you have chili-garlic paste with no big-ass chunks.
2. Heat oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add onion and saute that shit for 2 minutes. Add tempeh and saute until both onion and tempeh start to brown, about 3 more minutes. Flavor with soy sauce.
3. Add hominy, zucchini, oregano, cumin, and salt. Stir that shit all together, then add chili-garlic paste. Toss it around so everything is well coated, then add broth. Cover that bastard and let it simmer for 15 to 20 minutes. Add maple syrup and lime juice. Taste that f**ker and adjust spices whatever f**king way you like it.
4. Serve hot with your favorite toppings, such as sliced cabbage, avocado, and green onions; radishes cut into matchsticks; cilantro; and lime wedges.

Makes enough for 6 hungry people, no f**king problem. Per serving: 270 cal, 8 g fat (1.5 g sat), 40 g carbs, 1,140 mg sodium*,9 g fiber, 12 g protein

*Yeah, that’s a shit-ton of sodium, but if you make your own broth, it will be much lower.

MORE: 14 Instagram Accounts All (Mostly) Healthy Foodies Should Follow


Adapted from
Thug Kitchen (Rodale, October 2014). Available here and wherever books are sold.

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