Travel

Travel

Eagle + Child, Ramsbottom, Lancashire: hotel review

This nattily revamped pub has a new look and an excellent new chef – a welcome addition to this handsome town’s already thriving food scene

A historic Pennine mill town of stone cottages, cobbled alleys and imposing Victorian architecture, Ramsbottom can feel pretty remote from 21st-century life.

At weekends, you can arrive from nearby Bury by steam train on the East Lancashire Railway, perhaps to attend the World Black Pudding Throwing Championships (September 10). Later, as this is such fantastic walking country, you might clamber up Holcombe Moor to Peel Tower which (think Catherine Cookson) looks like the perfect backdrop for a fierce, rain-lashed argument between a pregnant scullery maid and her feckless wealthy lover.

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Business

5 Best Travel Hacks for Business Travellers

This article originally appeared on ValuePenguin To the outside world, travelling overseas for business seems to be both thrilling and glamorous. Who wouldn’t like to visit another country on an all-expense-paid trip? But for those who are constantly jetting off on work, the excitement soon wears off. When you are on a business trip, you need to be absolutely punctual – being late for meetings just won’t do. You probably have to juggle several activities simultaneously, leaving you little time for relaxation or sometimes even sleep. How can you then, as a businessperson travelling out of Singapore, make the most of your trip professionally? While each business trip may differ, here are some tips that you may find useful for every trip. Use an airline miles credit card to save on ticketing costs Booking tickets can be one of the most time-consuming and arduous tasks for a professional planning an overseas business trip. Comparing different airlines’ ticket costs and deciding on the most suitable time to take your flight can lead to a very frustrating experience for even the simplest of bookings. This is where using a credit card specifically tailored to take advantage of airline offers comes in. By their […]

The post 5 Best Travel Hacks for Business Travellers appeared first on The New Savvy.

Business

Kayak’s emoji search function brings the speed and fun of texting to travel

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Travel should be fun, not a hellish slog through dystopian security checkpoints and zombie-service employees with penal institution levels of charm. 

That’s why Kayak’s decision to add a bit of whimsy into the travel process by adding an emoji search function is more than welcome. 

If you’re not emoji fluent, this is the perfect excuse to step up your emoji game and learn about some of the more obscure symbols hiding in your texting arsenal. 

The function doesn’t work for all cities yet, but the first cities included are New York (🗽), Tokyo (🍣  sushi!), Chicago (🐇  O’Hare Airport), Dublin, Ireland (☘️ ), Las Vegas (slots! 🎰 ), Easter Island (🗿 ), Amsterdam (🚨 red light, get it?), Los Angeles, San Francisco (📱 yep, that’s a smartphone), and Toronto (🍁 ).  Read more…

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Business

Here’s why airlines have trouble with your hyphenated name

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If your name is too long, too short, hyphenated, or contains an apostrophe — you probably have trouble while flying.

Apostrophes, hyphens, and other special characters in names have been an issue for flyers for many years. A blog post from 2007 describes a flyer having trouble with booking a ticket because of a hyphenated last name. A decade later, another flyer, John Scott-Railton wrote a blog post about the same issue. Both airlines and technology have evolved plenty in that span and yet flying with a hyphenated name is as bad as ever. 

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Entertainment

How I Found My Zen in Kyoto’s Different Gardens and Temples

Last week I went on a five-day trip to Japan with my boyfriend and two friends. Our plan was to spend three days in Osaka and two days in Kyoto. In Japan almost every municipality has at least one temple. Kyoto, being a large cultural center, has several hundred. So we wanted to take a […]

The post How I Found My Zen in Kyoto’s Different Gardens and Temples appeared first on Preen.

Travel

Serene summer in Finland’s centenary national park

The Nordic country’s newly opened Hossa national park has all the wilderness an adventure traveller – or a bear – could desire

In a hide two miles from the Russian border in Finland’s Suomussalmi region, we watch and wait. For centuries, the European brown bear has been pushed by deforestation into increasingly remote areas, to do what a bear proverbially does in woods. Luckily, in Finland, where 76% of the land mass is dense forest, a bear doesn’t have to go very far for a little private time.

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Travel

East Sicily: what to see plus the best bars, beaches, restaurants and hotels

With baroque palaces, fine beaches and Mount Etna, the Ionian coast is home to most of the island’s crown jewels – underpinned by glorious local food and drink

Light reflecting off churches and palaces, views of craggy mountains and blue sea, smells of orange blossom, oregano and mint … Sicily is an inspiring place, particularly for northern Europeans. “To have seen Italy without having seen Sicily is not to have seen Italy at all,” said German writer Goethe in 1787.

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Travel

Hut stuff: Bournemouth’s new beach lodges

The seaside resort has reimagined the classic British beach hut as a chic bolthole that makes for an idyllic family break

When it comes to tourism initiatives, you can’t knock Bournemouth council for ambition. A decade ago, it had the seemingly brilliant idea of creating an artificial surf reef off Boscombe beach aimed at attracting surfers from far and wide, and also help renew the immediate area, one of the most deprived neighbourhoods in the whole of the south-west, according to a local charity. Sadly, it was a disaster and the project sank without trace, though the huge sandbags are still teetering somewhere on the sea bed.

But despite its failure to make waves (at least the right sort – it did generate plenty of unwanted headlines), such was the hype surrounding the proposed reef that redevelopment of the Boscombe pier area began anyway.

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Travel

10 top tips from our Los Angeles correspondent

Stars in the sky and on the silver screen, trips to the beach and a cemetery, plus a stroll with a local actor who calls himself ‘the people walker’ … LA delivers the goods for our west coast writer

Watch a movie at the Aero in Santa Monica, or the Egyptian in Hollywood: both are part of AmericanCinematheque, a not-for-profit organisation dedicated to promoting “America’s indigenous art form – the moving picture”. It has an old-style ambience and eclectic choices, and after screenings there are often Q&As with the films’ directors and stars. You can see top talent, especially in autumn – the run-up to awards season – when Oscar hopefuls come out to lobby.
americancinematheque.com

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Travel

Just chillin’: welcome to Iceland’s wild, wild Westfjords

Iceland’s popularity with tourists doesn’t mean that solitude is hard to find. Head west to its fjords and splendid isolation and nature are close at hand

There were no boats in the bay, no ships on the horizon. Underneath my feet was black sand that stretched a few hundred metres either side. The mountains of Deilir and Öskubakur were behind me and together we took in the sea view from Skálavík bay in Iceland’s Westfjords. The Denmark Strait was the water we watched and many miles north lay the east coast of Greenland.

Skálavík’s population is zero, the last residents having admitted defeat in 1964 in the face of weather that demanded more than a snug fleece and a decent pair of boots. Even in its pomp, in the 1890s, only 100 people toughed it out trying to make a living from the sea and the land. Now there are just hiking trails, plus a smattering of summer holiday homes and static caravans that sustain against the elements, courtesy of fences that rise above window level. Swings, a pushchair and toys on a porch or in a garden provided an eerie touch: a sort of presence amid absence.

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Travel

History in the hills: on the trail of Scotland’s prehistoric rock carvings

George Currie knows Scotland’s rock art. The former pop star has found nearly a quarter of the 3,000 pieces. Sam Wollaston joins him for some rock and stroll

I’m on a hillside above Dundee with a man named George who used to play lead guitar in the 70s doo-wop band Darts. We’re looking for prehistoric rock art, and finding it too. (George – George Currie – knew it was here; he found it before.) He pulls back a flap of turf from a rock to reveal what is known as a cup mark, a round depression in the surface. “Can you see that wee circle?” he says, brushing away the soil with his hand.

I can. And I’m not going to lie: in my – admittedly inexpert – opinion it doesn’t compare to the Altamira or Lascaux cave paintings. Nor am I having a Tutankhamun moment, suddenly seeing “wonderful things”. What I’m seeing is a dent in a rock, with a barely discernible ring round it. Made by a person, some time around 3300BC.

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Travel

Navigating Norfolk’s hidden creeks and salt marshes – in a 1950s whelk boat

With an ex-Marine at the helm, a new sailing adventure in north Norfolk offers the chance to enter a watery wilderness and get up close to seals and birdlife

We’re sailing across a sandy-coloured sea. Seals pop up around our little crab boat and then vanish, like a game of Whac-A-Mole. Further ahead, a group lie motionless on the water, as if levitating. It takes me a moment to realise that the sea is so shallow they are resting on a submerged sand bank.

The boat’s depth gauge reads 4ft. One false move and we’ll shudder on to the sand. We draw closer to a flat expanse of salt marsh coloured dun and olive. The captain edges us closer and then, as if by magic, marsh opens up. Before us is a secret creek, a portal into another world – limpid water, glistening mud banks, and no sound but the lonely piping of oystercatchers.

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Travel

Discovering Dartmoor: on patrol with the landscape detective

Relics of ancient Britain surround us, from bronze age burial mounds to stone rows older than the Pyramids. They may be easy to miss but look closely and you can read the story of the past in today’s countryside

Become a landscape detective, and you’ll not just see the new, the now; you’ll spot thousands of years of secret history layered and woven into the countryside around you, telling the story of what came before.

We’ve been tramping across the rough tussocks of Dartmoor for a couple of hours. Every now and then one of us yelps and disappears from view, knee deep in mire. If ever there were a British landscape designed for waterproof socks and hillwalker’s gaiters, even in summer, it’s this one.

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Travel

The Half Moon, Herne Hill, London: hotel review

This beautifully restored south London pub has fabulous rooms, a great vibe and some top ales. What a shame the generic food doesn’t hit the same heights

Dylan Thomas drank here and may have stumbled upon the title for Under Milk Wood while standing in the pub doorway and looking across the street to the sign for Milkwood Road, which is still there. In its heyday, U2, the Police and Van Morrison played the Half Moon’s back room, and even Frank Sinatra once gave an impromptu set when he popped in to see his chauffeur.

But by the time it closed in 2013, after being flooded by a burst water main, the old pub was more notorious than famous, a soulless den of dodgy London geezers swilling vapid lager. It was boarded up for nearly four years, but the walls of this grand late-Victorian pile hold too much history, it was too dear a local landmark and, crucially, it sits in too affluent an area of south London to stay closed for long. Its cracking location is between cool Brixton and leafy Dulwich Village, and it’s on the doorstep of Herne Hill station (less than 15 minutes to Victoria and the City), and Brockwell park and lido.

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Music

The alt city guide to Glasgow

A network of indie galleries, clubs, restaurants and bars has created a robust creative scene in Scotland’s largest city, where talent is allowed time to flourish

Richard McMaster, keyboard player in the Glasgow band Golden Teacher, is trying to explain why the city’s underground tends to shun media attention. “Scenes get hyped-up and go wrong but, because there’s no media here the way there is in London, things happen slowly and organically. There’s a community in Glasgow doing things for the right reasons: because they love music.” He is instinctively wary: “In many ways, even this discussion makes me feel uncomfortable.”

Music, the visual arts and that DIY approach go hand-in-hand in Glasgow and you can trace that back to punk

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Travel

Devon dip: wild swimming on the river Dart

The Outdoor Swimming Society’s Kari Furre kicks off a series of guided swims with experts, taking Jenny Landreth to one of her favourite spots near Totnes

“The joy of being down here,” Kari Furre said from her home in South Hams, Devon, “is that there’s so much choice. So what do you fancy?”

Kari was taking me out for this article: the first in a summer series of guided swims with expert swimmers. As director of the Outdoor Swimming Society (as well as an artist) she is certainly an expert, one of those names I’ve heard over time. We have friends in common, it’s our community – a game of Happy Swimming Families. “You know Carl?” “Yes, I know Carl. Do you know Tanya?” And so forth.

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Entertainment

Uh-Oh, Did the Department of Tourism Copy South Africa’s Ad?

The Department of Tourism is in hot water for allegedly copying South Africa’s tourism ad for their latest commercial. On Independence Day, the DOT released “Sights,” a one-minute ad featuring a Japanese tourist who’s exploring the Philippines. In the video, he narrates, “Here, you don’t have to see the sun to discover radiance. You don’t […]

The post Uh-Oh, Did the Department of Tourism Copy South Africa’s Ad? appeared first on Preen.