Travel

Travel

YHA The Sill at Hadrian’s Wall, Northumberland: hostel review

There’s been a hostel in this spot for more than 80 years but the new YHA flagship is one of a kind, with a museum and cafe and blending into the Unesco-listed landscape

At midday, we were lounging on a grassy roof terrace in blazing sunshine, gazing out over a 2,000-year-old world heritage site. By midnight, we were lazing in a stargazing hammock, watching a meteor shower flash across one of the world’s darkest skies. It could have been a boutique hotel in Chile’s Atacama desert, but it was a £15-a-night youth hostel in Northumberland.

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Travel

The best of northern Spain: readers’ travel tips

Forget crowded Med beaches: the four coastal regions of España Verde offer cool cities, wild shores and great walking in verdant coast and mountains

If you’d rather stray far from the tourist trail, the Basque Coast Geopark is a delight. It’s a protected area of the coastline around Mutriku, Deba, and Zumaia. There are 13km of cliffs made up of flysch (shale bed) deposits which have created layered and bizarre rock formations. We felt as though we were on the set of Jurassic Park. These staggering cliffs show how the Earth changed over millions of years and fossils are plentiful for the kids to admire. A boat tour is a great way to see it and costs €20 adult, €10 under-12s.
geoparkea.com
Lisa Anderson

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Photography

Rowing in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland – in pictures

Coastal rowing in small traditional skiffs is undergoing a revival in Scotland. Photographer Murdo MacLeod joins a community club on an expedition to explore the islands off Lewis and Harris

We are not a rampaging clan but a community rowing club come to reacquaint ourselves with our coastal environment and heritage on a four-day tour off the coast of Lewis and Harris in the Outer Hebrides. Our fleet comprised 40 rowers and sailors in five skiffs, a one-man row boat, a 10-metre dipping lugsail and two safety craft.

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Entertainment

Why Nyhavn Should Be Your First Stop When You Visit Denmark

As the oldest child in my family, I’m naturally assigned to book hotels, find tour packages, and look up the top sites of whatever foreign city we were visiting next. So when we set to visit Copenhagen one summer, I did the same pre-departure ritual. What a simple Google search will tell you is that […]

The post Why Nyhavn Should Be Your First Stop When You Visit Denmark appeared first on Preen.

Travel

Modern family: Greece with grown-up kids

A decade after a first family holiday in Greece, Martin Love heads to Paxos – and finds it wonderfully unchanged

The five of us stretched out on yoga mats with our toes pointing towards the sea. Above us the breeze stirred the leaves of the ancient olive trees. “Eímai edó,” intoned Sophie. “In Greek that means, ‘I am here.’” She continued in her gentle voice. “I am here in Paxos. I have arrived. I have moored on this rock surrounded by sea …”

Sophie was training to be a mindfulness teacher. When we lay down I’d have bet my favourite Speedos that we’d soon be in fits of laughter, but not one of us so much as sniggered. We lay in still, neat rows, like sardines, as her soothing words washed over us. After a while, Sophie brought us up from the depths. “I hope you are now at one with this island,” she said. We’d been on Paxos for less than half a day yet I had the giddy sensation I might just chuck it all in and stay here forever.

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Travel

UK road trip: the Anglo-Scottish border

There’s so much dramatic scenery and history on this week-long itinerary that crisscrosses between Scotland and England several times, taking in castles, beaches and wildlife
More road trips: Dorset to Cornwall | coast to coast

The Anglo-Scottish border is a place of wild beauty, with a rich, poetic and bloody history. This is the land of the reivers, fierce clans of brigands who, from the 13th century until the Union of the Crowns in 1603, were to this region what the Apaches were to the US-Mexican frontier. Carlisle’s Tullie House Museum has an excellent permanent exhibition about them.

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Travel

The Great House, Sonning, Berkshire: hotel review

The riverside village beloved of Jerome K Jerome and George Clooney is home to a swish bar and restaurant and, now, characterful but good-value bedrooms to match

It is obligatory, when writing about the Thames-side village of Sonning, to quote Jerome K Jerome. In his 1889 novel Three Men in a Boat he said: “It is the most fairy-like little nook on the whole river. It is more like a stage village than one built of bricks and mortar.” It has retained these charms but now there is another name to drop: George Clooney. He and his wife, Amal, bought a £10m house here in 2014. They are the latest in a long line of celebrity residents of this village four miles east of Reading, from Terence Rattigan to, er, Uri Geller.

I arrive expecting to see Clooneys around every corner. Alas, it isn’t to be: perhaps they are in one of their other houses, in LA, Lake Como, or Mexico … But enough celeb-stalking; I’m here to check out the Great House at Sonning, which reopened in May after a major refurbishment. The main building is a Grade II-listed Elizabethan inn, with gardens spilling down to the river. There are more rooms around the courtyard – 49 in all, from “cosy” to suites.

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Travel

First Venice and Barcelona: now anti-tourism marches spread across Europe

Demos in San Sebastián and crackdowns in Rome and Dubrovnik as locals vent frustration at city-breakers and cruise ships

With the continent sweltering under a heatwave nicknamed Lucifer, tempers have been boiling over, too, as a wave of anti-tourism protests take place in some of Europe’s most popular destinations. Yet, as “tourism-phobia” becomes a feature of the summer, the World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) has defended the sector, calling on local authorities to do more to manage growth in a sustainable manner.

Ensuring tourism is an enriching experience for visitors and hosts alike demands strong, sustainable tourism policies

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Art

Maudie’s Nova Scotia: exploring the landscapes that inspired Maud Lewis

With the Canadian artist’s joyful work celebrated in a new film, Maudie, a road trip around dramatic coast and picturesque villages reveals the area she loved to paint

The film Maudie is every bit as magical, hypnotic and heartwarming as the child-like paintings of rural Nova Scotia by artist Maud Lewis, whose life and work inspired the movie, released last week. Her art, depicting cows, cats, horses and fishing villages, prompted Sally Hawkins, who plays her, to say: “There’s this beautiful humour that comes out of her work and this lovely sense of joy.”

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Travel

A river-swimmer’s paradise in the heart of England

It may be plain old open-water swimming rather than a wild adventure but the tranquil rivers near Oundle and Olney, in the south Midlands, have plenty of pulling power

Preconceptions about places we’ve never been are formed in a multitude of ways: what we read, watch or hear about it, and sometimes even the people who are from there – whether we like them or not. Occasionally, there are areas we have no idea about. For me, that was a section in the heart of England: the south Midlands. Then I went to swim there.

“What’s this area called?” I had asked Bryn Dymott, my swimming guide for the day. Bryn had met me off the train in St Neots, Cambridgeshire, and had rapidly transported us into … well, just where had he taken us?

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Travel

Strolling the ancient hillforts of southern England

Our writer gets a vivid picture of prehistoric times on a walk in the Wiltshire Downs: one of 4,000 iron age sites across Britain and Ireland mapped on a new website

They stand in a clear line along the Wiltshire Downs facing north: perhaps facing an enemy whose identity we do not know. In the bright sunshine of late spring, I could see the hillforts stretching away along the escarpment – Barbury, then Liddington, and finally Uffington, with its famous chalk white horse. They may have been begun in the bronze age, but reached their apogee in the iron age, in the first millennium BC.

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Travel

How to cook, and eat, like an Italian: a foodie week in Puglia

A cookery school and some amazing restaurants transport Harriet Green and her family to foodie raptures

We walk into the massive kitchen and Aldo, the chef, announces that he can tell at a glance who does the cooking at home. He’s not talking about me. My husband exudes calm, Aldo says. He has, it seems, the look of someone who can stand the heat. Stung by this, I’m determined to prove Aldo wrong, and outshine my husband.

We’ve come to Puglia with our teenage daughter, to cook like locals at Borgo Egnazia cooking school. On today’s menu is orecchiette, classic Puglian pasta shaped like little ears.

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Travel

Five Acre Barn, Leiston, Suffolk: hotel review

With adventurous contemporary architecture, cool styling and a warm welcome, this is a chic alternative to Suffolk’s many old-fashioned, chintzy B&Bs

To most first-time visitors, the Suffolk coast seems a sleepy kind of place. Cut off by a lack of main roads (either refreshing or frustrating, depending on your perspective), its Constable landscapes remain largely unchanged, its coastal towns and villages yielding to a bygone idyll of rowing boats (Thorpeness), faded Victorian architecture (Aldeburgh) and wind-whipped walks and crabbing (Walberswick). It seems peculiar that an area such as this, so obviously ripe for swooning urbanites, has so few decent places to stay – other than full holiday houses or chintzy B&Bs.

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Business

3 Tips On Planning Your National Day Long Weekend Holiday

This article originally appeared on ValuePenguin Another long weekend is coming up in Singapore in August: National Day. By taking time off on either the 7th and the 8th or the 10th and the 11th, you can enjoy a 5 day vacation. If you haven’t already planned out your vacation plans, it’s still not too late to start making some travel plans. There are many options available in Asia that are exciting, beautiful and financially affordable. Here are some tips to help you make your decisions. 14 Places You Can Fly To For Under S$300 Roud-Trip According to Kayak, there are still 14 cities that you can fly to for under S$300 for a round trip ticket. Some popular options that stood out were Penang, Yangon, Bangkok, Phuket, PHnom Penh, Manila and Ho Chi Minh City. We looked up prices for non-stop round-trip flights from Singapore to various locations in SE Asia for both 5 August – 9 August trip and 9 August – 13 August trip. For those who are willing to splurge a little more, a flight to Bali or Maldives was still available for around S$600. 5 Aug – 9 Aug Price (SGD) 9 Aug – 13 Aug

The post 3 Tips On Planning Your National Day Long Weekend Holiday appeared first on The New Savvy.

Travel

10 great wilderness cabins and campsites in Canada: readers’ tips

Whether it’s backcountry camping, huts for post-hike relaxation or a hot tub and luxury cabin after a day in a canoe, our tipsters know some great stays

Simply one of the most beautiful places I have ever visited: remote, barely known, a hidden gem, this is Lake Atlin. The view from the deck of the cabin is so stunning you can only stand and stare in awe at the lake dotted with forested islands, lined with wild beaches, backed by the vast mountains, snow fields and glaciers of Alaska and the Yukon – all reflected in the water. These cabins, set on an unspoilt alpine mountainside, have spring water, logs, barbecue supplied and canoes for rent. Follow lake or mountain trails and sleep like never before in the silence of the wilderness.
From C$79 (around £50) a night, sleeps two, additional person £7.50, glacierviewcabins.ca
heather

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Travel

10 of the best things to do in Pisa

A €30m redevelopment has funded the revamp of many of this walkable Italian city’s main attractions – including its tower – and there are great bars, restaurants and hotels to relax in after the sightseeing

The leaning tower, duomo and baptistery are must-sees. It costs nothing to wander the green lawns (with crowds picnicking and taking silly photographs), admiring the centuries-old white marble and 5.5-degree lean on the Torre Pendente. Entry to the tower is pricey (€18pp/under-10s free) but includes the cathedral. It’s a thrill to climb the steep, narrow steps once trodden by Galileo Galilei, and the view of the city is superb. From this year, 2km of the city walls are open (first weekend of the month, 10am-6pm, free), providing views also of Camposanto cemetery and of the huge weights used to pull the tower 45cm closer to vertical in 2007, after it was closed amid safety fears.

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Travel

A Canterbury trail: exploring the city’s medieval streets on foot

With its extraordinary history and ecclesiastical grandeur, Kent’s murder mystery capital has much for the walker to savour on a day’s stroll
More UK city walks by Alan Franks

The place is, in a word, cryptic. This is not just because of the cathedral’s vast undercroft and the tales its stones could tell about the strange murder of an archbishop in the late 12th century. There’s a sense of the city’s riddlesome quality even before arriving.

One of the two railway stations, Canterbury West, is no further to the west than the other one, Canterbury East. What’s more, Canterbury West is situated right at the north of the town, while Canterbury East is right at the south. Once inside the old walls, middle England does its best to assert stability in the Kent peninsula, but don’t be taken in; this is the eternal capital of medieval murder mystery.

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